Adam Neiman, piano

American pianist Adam Neiman is hailed as one of the premiere pianists of his generation, praised for possessing a truly rare blend of power, bravura, imagination, sensitivity, and technical precision. With an established international career and an encyclopedic repertoire that spans more than sixty concerti, Neiman has performed as soloist with the symphony orchestras of Belgrade, Chicago, Cincinnati, Dallas, Detroit, Houston, Indianapolis, Minnesota, Saint Louis, San Francisco, Slovenia, Umbria, and Utah, as well as with the New York Chamber Symphony and the National Symphony Orchestra of Washington D.C. He has collaborated with many of the world’s celebrated conductors, including Jiri Belohlavek, Giancarlo Guerrero, Theodor Gushlbauer, Carlos Kalmer, Uros Lajovic, Yoël Levi, Andrew Litton, Rossen Milanov, Heichiro Ohyama, Peter Oundjian, Leonard Slatkin, and Emmanuel Villaume.

A highly-acclaimed recitalist, Neiman has performed in most of the major cities and concert halls throughout the United States and Canada. His European solo engagements have brought him to Italy, France, Germany, the United Kingdom, and Japan, where he made an eight-city tour culminating in his debut at Tokyo’s Suntory Hall.

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Neiman’s recent season highlights include monumental solo recital tours of North America presenting the complete Rachmaninoff Preludes and Études-tableaux, followed up by a triple disc recording, due for release on Aeolian Classics in 2017. Prior to that, Neiman toured extensively with an equally behemoth project, pairing Beethoven’s Diabelli Variations, Op. 120, and “Hammerklavier” Sonata, Op. 106; he subsequently recorded a double disc set, due for release on Sono Luminus in 2017. Additionally, audiences may look forward to a long-awaited DVD release of his complete Liszt Transcendental Études, recorded live in Los Angeles. Above and beyond his epic recital projects, Neiman premiered his Concerto for Piano and String Orchestra (commissioned and composed in 2012) with the Manchester Chamber Orchestra and conductor Ariel Rudiakov on tour throughout Vermont and New York, and gave a west coast premieres in Telluride. A high-definition video release of the world premiere performance is available on Neiman’s YouTube channel.

Current chamber music recording releases include the following: the complete Rachmaninoff and Tchaikovsky Piano Trios with Trio Solisti, for Bridge; Ravel and Chausson Piano Trios with Trio Solisti, for Bridge; Bernstein Piano Trio with the Seattle Chamber Music Society, for Onyx; Concerto da Camera by Howard Hanson with the Ying Quartet, for Sono Luminus; Dohnanyi’s Sextet for Clarinet, Horn, Violin, Viola, Cello, and Piano with the 45th Parallel ensemble in Portland, Oregon; and piano quartets of Saint-Saëns and Fauré with Maria Bachmann, Hsin-Yun Huang, and Edward Arron. These releases add to a rapidly expanding chamber discography consisting of the following recordings: Arensky’ s Piano Quintet with the Ying Quartet, for Sono Luminus; Sonatas by Franck, Debussy, and Saint-Saëns with violinist Maria Bachmann, for Bridge; and the world premiere recording of Jennifer Higdon’s Piano Trio, for Naxos.

His diverse solo discography includes three releases for VAI: a two-disc set of Mozart’s early keyboard concertos with the Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra, an award-winning two-disc set entitled “Adam Neiman Live in Recital,” proclaimed “Critic’s Choice” for 2007 and 2008 by the American Record Guide, and a DVD entitled “Adam Neiman: Chopin Recital.” He released a critically-acclaimed recording of solo piano works by Anton Arensky for Naxos, and his debut recording on Lyric Records of a live, unedited solo recital at Tokyo’s Suntory Hall has recently been re-issued.

Neiman’s live recording presence has extended to the Internet, via his own YouTube channel featuring high-definition video footage from recent concert tours, found at: http://www.youtube.com/user/adamneiman

Radio and television broadcasts featuring Neiman regularly span international airwaves, and his live performance of the Brahms Rhapsodies, Op. 79, at the Gilmore International Keyboard Festival on NPR’s “Performance Today” was nominated for a Grammy Award. Chosen as a featured artist by director and Academy Award nominee Josh Aronson, Adam Neiman appeared in the PBS documentary film “Playing for Real,” which aired worldwide and continues to air on the Bravo and Ovation networks. He was also featured in Peter Rosen’s “In the Key of G,” a PBS documentary about the Gilmore Festival.

His affiliation with PBS and the documentary genre has merged with his passion for composition: he wrote the score for “Forgiveness: A Time to Love and a Time to Hate,” a film by director and Emmy Award winner Helen Whitney, released on PBS in 2010. His output as a composer encompasses an array of works for solo piano, chamber music, voice, and symphony orchestra, and he is currently polishing a trove of film music samples for his cinematic portfolio. Some of his chamber works have been premiered at the Seattle Chamber Music Festival, Poisson Rouge in New York City, and at the Festival Cervantinos in Mexico, and he frequently performs his own solo piano music in recital. In 2012 he witnessed the world premiere of his first String Quartet at the Seattle Chamber Music Festival, and he is currently in the process of finishing his Second Symphony.

Born in 1978, Neiman has captured the attention of audiences and critics alike since his concerto debut at 11 in Los Angeles’s Royce Hall. Clavier Magazine wrote, “Adam Neiman gave a performance that rivaled those of many artists on the concert stage today…his playing left listeners shaking their heads in disbelief.” His formative years saw him at the helm of many competitions, with top prizes at the MTNA’s Junior Baldwin Competition, UCLA’s Samick International Competition, the Joanna Hodges International Competition, the Stravinsky Awards International Competition, the Young Keyboard Artists Association International Competition, the California Concerto Competition, and the California State Bartok Competition. At fourteen, he debuted in Germany at the Ivo Pogorelich Festival, and at fifteen, he won second prize at the Casagrande International Piano Competition in Italy, the youngest medalist in the competition’s history. In 1995, Neiman also became the youngest-ever winner of the Gilmore Young Artist Award. The following year, he won the Young Concert Artists International Auditions and went on to make his Washington D.C. and New York recital debuts at the Kennedy Center and the 92nd Street Y. The Washington Post remarked, “A collection of Chopin’s Waltzes and Nocturnes danced and stormed, and Prokofieff’s Second Sonata enthralled with a dazzling display of inner voices rather than a mere display of muscle. This was playing of wisdom and light befitting an artist in the autumn of his career.” Young Concert Artists additionally honored Neiman with the Michaels Award and presented him in a critically acclaimed solo recital at Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center.

Two-time winner of Juilliard’s Gina Bachauer International Piano Competition, Neiman received the Rubinstein Award upon his graduation in 1999, the same year in which he received the Avery Fisher Career Grant. Neiman’s principal teachers have included Trula Whelan, Hans Boepple, Herbert Stessin, and Fanny Waterman, and he has participated in master classes with legendary pianists Emanuel Ax, Jacob Lateiner, and György Sandor.

In 2015, Neiman was awarded the full-time position of Assistant Professor of Piano at the Chicago College of Performing Arts at Roosevelt University. He was a member of the esteemed Artist-Faculty at the CCPA for two years prior, and, in addition to his rigorous performance schedule, he has been teaching private lessons for more than a decade. Neiman has presented acclaimed masterclasses throughout the U.S., Europe, and Korea. He regularly serves on the summer chamber music faculty of the Manchester Music Festival in Vermont, and he has taught at the Great Mountains Music Festival in Korea.

As an adjudicator, he has presided over the Philadelphia Orchestra Concerto Competition, KING FM Young Artists Competition, and Reno’s Youth Music Festival, and in 2016 he will judge the Northwestern University Concerto Competition and the Chicago Amateur Piano Competition.

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